If you want to do cruising and street style on the same board then you probably want a large board and larger wheels, as many have already commented. I think that an 8 inch board with at least 56 mm wheels will be best. I think that you should find a local shop to support and to talk to about gear. I would advise getting a shop deck, with Independent trucks (at the correct width for your board, which is one detail that a local shop should be able to help with) Bones street tech formula wheels (I like profiles 1 and, I think 5), and Bones Reds bearings (not super reds, super reds are not super).
In March 1976, Skateboard City skatepark in Port Orange, Florida and Carlsbad Skatepark in San Diego County, California would be the first two skateparks to be opened to the public, just a week apart. They were the first of some 200 skateparks that would be built through 1982. This was due in part to articles that were running in the investment journals at the time, stating that skateparks were a good investment.[6][27][38] Notable skateboarders from the 1970s also include Ty Page, Tom Inouye, Laura Thornhill, Ellen O'Neal, Kim Cespedes, Bob Biniak, Jana Payne, Waldo Autry, Robin Logan, Bobby Piercy, Russ Howell, Ellen Berryman, Shogo Kubo, Desiree Von Essen, Henry Hester, Robin Alaway, Paul Hackett, Michelle Matta, Bruce Logan, Steve Cathey, Edie Robertson, Mike Weed, David Hackett, Gregg Ayres, Darren Ho, and Tom Sims.[35]
Chocolate Skateboards is a skateboarding company distributed by Crailtap. Following on the heels of Girl, Chocolate was launched in 1994 by Mike Carroll and Rick Howard and is known by its Chocolate hearts logo. Their skateboards are made of durable seven-ply maple. Graphics are also important to the Chocolate brand, and you will find things such as classic cars or cartoons. You can find complete Chocolate skateboards with deck, trucks, wheels and bearings, customized decks, accessories, and apparel. The Chocolate team consists of Vincent Alvarez, Kenny Anderson, Chico Brenes, Justin Eldridge, Jesus Fernandez, Chris Roberts, Elijah Berle, Stevie Perez, Raven Tershy, and Jerry Hsu.
You seem to love Toy Machine deep in your heart! Ed Tempelton’s brand did well this year and landed four places above last year’s ranking. In addition to many other exhilarating designs, the Turtles deck series was the most acclaimed one. The quality is proven by team riders such as Leo Romero, Collin Provost, Daniel Lutheran and Co. You can get your Toy Machine deck from 59.99 € | 50.00 GBP!
Thunder trucks are solid, with some great innovations. Thunder's light truck range claims ​to be the lightest available, with the quickest turning. Thunder's team is also pretty impressive, with Thomas, Appleyard, Marks, Steamer, Ellington. The list is actually pretty huge. If having a lot of pros ride the same trucks as you is important (which isn't a bad idea - these people are skating in competitions, and want the best!), then take a look at Thunder.

Founded in 2008 in Pennsylvania, Punisher’s goal has been to make graphically pleasing skateboards that have designs that resonate with the rider on a deeper level. Each artist is handpicked by Punisher to design an original, unique image that is then incorporated into the skateboard. The fantastic graphic designs combined with the quality of the skateboard itself make for a very personalized riding experience.
This entry is all about giving you an insight through the eyes of skatedeluxe. Which brands dominated your year in 2015? Our compilation of the ‘brands of the year’ is based on a combined check of deck sales, brand shop visits, your search requests and common interest on blog entries to skateboarding’s MVPs. Our in-house brand SK8DLX has been left out of the ranking. Still, we want to thank you that you keep skating our boards and that you seem to like what we put out. Enough talking, let’s start with the Top 15 skateboard deck brands of the year 2015
Pro decks are what most people are familiar with and what is seen most commonly around skateparks and driveways around the US.  These decks can have a variety of different logos and images on them and sometimes are a specific professional skater’s pro deck.  Pro decks provide skaters a way to support their favorite riders and have the same equipment they see all their favorite pros using.  The quality of professional decks and parts are almost always very high as they have a reputable and brand image to uphold.  For this higher level of quality and you can expect to pay 2-3x the cost of a blank complete.  If you want to save some money and still have a pro look, there are options available that have generic blank parts with a pro deck.  This may be a good option for a beginner skater who is not yet doing complex tricks that may break these cheaper parts, but they still want the look and feel of a pro skateboard.  As the skater progresses they can then switch out these generic parts for higher-end options as necessary.
Buy a quality deck. Decks available at your local department store are usually of low quality and have pictures of cartoon characters on the bottom. If you want an entire board, but don't know exactly what you want, buy a complete skateboard from a company or go to a skate shop and ask the employee about the products. If you want to ride on the streets, get a 7.5 to 8.0 deck, if you want to ride vert, 8.0 and up is probably best. However, it's all personal preference. People street skate all the time with decks over 8.0.
Sending sincere thanks to everyone that supported us over the last decade – including team riders, fans, customers, photographers, filmers, & mags. Thanks to George & Juli Powell & everyone at Skate One Corp. who believed in us & helped facilitate our vision. Thanks most of all to Cara-Beth Burnside for whom without her influence, leadership, & no-bullshit-spirit none of this would have ever been possible.
If you are completely new to skateboarding, consider taking a minute to read through the Skateboard Decks Section in our Buyer’s Guide will be helpful, but a good rule of thumb is: the bigger your feet, the wider your board should be. If you wear a size 9 and up, you can’t go wrong with buying an 8” board. Narrow boards are easier to flip while wider boards are more stable, but there are no hard and fast rules to skateboarding. The only way to really find out what you like is by trying new shapes, sizes, and brands. Brands like Welcome, Baker, Chocolate, Deathwish, and Element all have a wide variety of sizes, shapes, and graphics.
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